August 4, 1863

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, August 4, 1863 — 4 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Guarding Louisville and Nashville Railroad and Cumberland River west of it, including Henderson and Smithland, 4,000 men; guarding Lebanon branch, 400 men; at Carthage, which really belongs to General Rosecrans, and over which we can exercise no control, 1,700 men; on Big Sandy, 2,100 men; southeast frontier, Booneville, &c., 1,100 men; Covington and Lexington Railroad and provost guards, 1,300 men; Louisville and Frankfort Railroad and provost guards, 550 men; fragments of Tennessee regiments forming at Camp Nelson, 1,100 men. The remainder of the force, about 11,000 men, are concentrating at Lebanon, Stanford, and Glasgow, with outpost on the Cumberland. When Morgan broke through our lines this force occupied Tompkinsville, Somerset, and London. Since then we have taken 4,000 prisoners, and their horses and arms. The regiments have necessarily been much scattered, and it has taken time and labor to concentrate them, some of them having to be brought from Eastern Ohio. If you will contemplate the work done by these men you will realize that they need refilling. By weakening the garrisons, we can move with 12,000 men in a short time, but when we arrive at our destination the enemy’s forces can be concentrated against us by railroad with great rapidity; but I shall go as soon as possible. Had our garrisons been less on the railroads, both Morgan and Scott would have broken them. The Twelfth Rhode Island has been mustered out, the Twentieth Kentucky captured, and four regiments of cavalry and one of infantry are about to be mustered out. The Ninth Corps not yet arrived from Vicksburg. Will Getty’s division be sent to me?

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

August 3, 1863

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, August 3, 1863.

Maj. Gen. H.W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

The rebel force under Scott, which I reported having crossed the Kentucky River, are now in full retreat in direction of Somerset, with Colonel Sanders in close pursuit. A great many mules and horses and over 300 prisoners have been captured; among these Colonel (H.M.) Ashby. They came into Kentucky to make a diversion in favor of Morgan, and will probably be much damaged before getting out.

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

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AUGUST 3, 1863.

General HARTSUFF, Lexington, Ky.:

I do not care to have any permanent changes made in the troops now in Kentucky, as I propose to move them as soon as possible. Let all the troops that have been on the move be concentrated at Lebanon and Hickman Bridge, and there be fitted out. Have all the cavalry ready to move by Saturday night, and all the deficiencies supplied. I shall organize the main body into a separate command. Only keep enough cavalry at the front to scout the country well to the Cumberland River. The Ninth Corps will be here in a few days, but it is very much reduced in numbers. I want to increase its divisions by adding some new regiments and transferring some of the regiments now in Kentucky. The cavalry is being shipped to Hickman Bridge as fast as it arrives. There are plenty of horses here, if they are needed at Hickman Bridge. I am giving the necessary instructions to the cavalry that are in Ohio.

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, August 3, 1863 — 5.20 p.m.

Major-General BURNSIDE,

Cincinnati, Ohio:

You will immediately report the position of your forces.

H.W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

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HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., SECOND DIV., TWENTY-THIRD A.C.,

Madisonville, August 3, 1863.

Col. LEWIS RICHMOND:

I see that Major Rue still claims the capture of Morgan, under General Burnside. Rue reported to me on Saturday night, was acting directly under my orders, a part of the First and Third Kentucky Cavalry being in the front with him. Morgan never surrendered to Rue; (when he) came up with him, he sent back to the head of the column for re-enforcements. Rue refused to take any action until I got up. In behalf of my command, who followed Morgan thirty days and nights, I appeal to the general to set this matter right.

J.M. SHACKELFORD.

August 2, 1863

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HDQRS. SIXTH DIVISION, SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Columbus, Ky., August 2, 1863.

Lieut. Col. HENRY BINMORE,

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs., Sixteenth Army Corps:

COLONEL: I beg to forward Colonel Waring’s report of yesterday from Feliciana.

Mr. (W.F.) Buckner, Board of Trade at Hickman, arrived yesterday morning at 1 o’clock, reporting 40 mounted rebels near the town. I at once sent the steamer Crawford, with two companies of infantry and one company of cavalry, to capture them. After scouting to Troy and Union City, the troops returned to Hickman, and in the evening to Columbus, without meeting any rebel force.

For the ensuing election, I have ordered all the support required to enable the judges of elections to prevent any participation or interference by disloyal persons.

Respectfully, colonel, your obedient servant,

ASBOTH,

Brigadier-General.

(inclosure.)

HDQRS. 1ST BRIGADE, 6TH DIVISION, 16TH ARMY CORPS,

Camp Gilmore, August 1, 1863.

Capt. T.H. HARRIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report my command encamped one-half mile north of the railroad station at Feliciana.

I have no news of the least consequence, except of a few guerrillas in the neighborhood. I have sent out scouting parties, and have adopted other means of ascertaining the truth of the rumor about Roddey’s forces. From my present knowledge, I am of the opinion that no such force has crossed the river.

I have sent a messenger to find Colonel Hatch, and will report the result.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. W. WARING, JR.,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

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HDQRS. SIXTH DIVISION, SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Columbus, Ky., August 2, 1863.

Brig. Gen. N.B. BUFORD, Commanding Cairo:

GENERAL: The general commanding division directs that you send one discreet, well-posted, and firm commissioned officer, with 10 men, to each of the following voting precincts, with copies of the inclosed Special Orders, No. 159, from headquarters Sixteenth Army Corps, and General Orders, Nos. 47 and 49, from these headquarters, and full instructions to effectually carry out their spirit and letter: McChristian’s, Ky.; Thorp’s, Ky.; Fort Jefferson, Ky.

It is necessary that the men should be at the polls by 6 o’clock to-morrow morning, and each officer should have the assistance of a well-posted citizen of known loyalty. The general calls your attention to the unofficial but authentic newspaper report of the declaration by Major-General Burnside of martial law over the State of Kentucky on 3d instant.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

T.H. HARRIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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AUGUST 2, 1863.

Major-General BURNSIDE, Cincinnati, Ohio:

DEAR GENERAL: I have to thank you for your note of the 31st ultimo, in which you are pleased to speak so favorably of the militia of Ohio. When we remember the company organizations, by the election of officers, were yet barely accomplished at the date of the  call upon them, your praise is well bestowed. Now that the men know each other, as well as their officers, you may rely with perfect safety upon the militia of Ohio in any emergency that can by any possibility occur.

Very truly, yours,

DAVID TOD,

Governor.

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COLUMBUS, August 2, 1863.

General BURNSIDE:

Morgan and his officers were turned over to the warden of the penitentiary. Their hair was trimmed and beards shaved for cleanliness. They were not put in prison clothes. They are in separate cells, and allowed two hours in the morning and two in the afternoon for exercise and conversation, and are entirely separated from the convicts.

JNO. S. MASON,

Brigadier-General.

Expedition from Columbus to Hickman, Ky., August 1, 1863

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Report of Lieut. Col. Edward H. Mix, Thirty-second Iowa Infantry.

COLUMBUS, KY., August 9, 1863.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report movements under Special Orders, No. 191, Headquarters, District of Columbus, as follows:

At 2 a.m. on the 1st instant, was detailed to command the expedition, consisting of two companies, B & I, Thirty-second Iowa Infantry, under Captains Miller and Hutchison, and one company, Captain Hanson’s, Fourth Missouri Cavalry.

I arrived at Hickman on board steamer Crawford about sunrise, and was informed that a party of rebels, estimated at 40 in number, were 6 miles distant. I immediately dispatched Captain Hanson with his command to look them up and follow as rapidly as possible, mounting about one-half the infantry on horses and mules picked up in the town and vicinity. Captain Hanson’s movements were so rapid that I did not come up with him, he moving on Troy after finding that the rebels were said to be at that place 200 strong. I immediately sent forward the mounted infantry to his support, the remainder following. Before reaching Troy, was advised by Captain Hanson that the rebels had left and were but 20 in number, also that he would return to Hickman via Union City. Upon this I ordered the infantry back to Hickman, and awaited Captain Hanson’s return, which occurred about sunset. Took steamer immediately, and returned to Columbus without casualty.

I deem it my duty to call the attention of the general commanding the district to the fact that many of the loyal men of Hickman and vicinity live in daily fear of their lives at the hands of roving bands of rebels, and spend their nights in the woods and places of concealment. They are very anxious for protection, which seems practicable.

Several loyal men were robbed of horses and arms on the 31st ultimo in that neighborhood. From the examination I made of the country, and the extended scout of Captain Hanson without other results than here stated, I think it safe to say that the country about Hickman cannot be protected from Columbus.

The activity of Captain Hanson and command and the energy and good judgment displayed by him deserve commendation. The infantry command did all that was possible most cheerfully. The heat of the day and the fatigues of the scout were borne without a murmur.

All of which is respectfully submitted by your obedient servant,

EDWD. H. MIX.

T.H. HARRIS, Assistant Adjutant-General, Columbus, Ky.

August 1, 1863

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AUGUST 1, 1863.

General JOHN H. MORGAN:

(Care of N. Merion, warden, &c.)

SIR: In order that I might fully investigate the facts touching your surrender, I have delayed until this time replying to your communication of the 28th ultimo, in which you claim that you surrendered to one Captain Burbridge (Burbick), of the Ohio State Militia, upon terms and conditions, and in which you demand of me as commander-in-chief of the Ohio State forces that the terms of surrender accorded to you by said Burbridge be fully and fairly carried out. I have now investigated the facts, and find them to be substantially as follows: That a private citizen of New Lisbon by the name of Burbick (and not Burbridge, as you suppose) went out with some 15 or 16 others to meet your forces, in advance of a volunteer organized military body from the same place, under command of Captain Curry; that said Burbrick is not, and never was, a military officer in the service of this State; that he was captured by you and traveled with you some considerable distance before your surrender; that upon his discovering the regular military forces in the service of the United States to be in your advance in line of battle, you surrendered to said Burbrick, then your prisoner. Whether you supposed him to be a captain in the militia service or not is entirely immaterial. I must, therefore, treat your surrender or yielding up as having been made to the forces under the command of the United States officers, and therefore, as Chief Executive of this State, I can claim no control over you.

DAVID TOD,

Governor.

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ABINGDON, August 1, 1863.

PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL.

Major-General JONES,

C.A. Army, Dublin, Va.:

GENERAL: I have just received your letter, by Lieutenant Adams, and thank you very sincerely for your courtesy and promptitude in lending me the Napoleon guns. I have no definite orders as yet from General Buckner, but your conjecture is correct. The details have not yet been settled and arranged. I suppose I shall hear from Buckner, and that he will come up to this place. The move will be against the enemy on the Sandy, I think, and you can render, in my judgment, material assistance in employing their attention or keeping them from attacking our communications by such a movement as you propose. As soon as the plan is definitely determined, I will endeavor to inform you minutely.

I send the Government cipher which you desire, with the key sentence used by General Buckner.

Believe me, very truly, yours:

W. PRESTON.

P.S. — On looking again at your letter, it seems you have the Government cipher, or “signal corps cipher,” as it is called, so that I do not send it as stated. We will correspond by it. The key sentence shall be “My Old Kentucky Home.” Buckner uses the same.

July 31, 1863

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JULY 31, 1863.

GENERAL: The rebel force under Scott, which I reported as having crossed the Kentucky River, is now in full retreat, in the direction of Somerset, with Colonel Sanders in close pursuit. A great many arms, horses, and over 300 prisoners have been captured, among them Colonel (H.M.) Ashby. They came into Kentucky to make a diversion in favor of Morgan, and will probably be much damaged before getting out.

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

General H.W. HALLECK, Washington.

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LEXINGTON, July 31, 1863 — 10..30 a.m.

GENERAL: Have just (received) the following from Sanders:

IRVINE, KY., July 30, 1863 — 12 m.

I have just arrived at this place, after 48 miles marching in twenty-two hours, over very rough and muddy roads. We fought the rear of the enemy, and drove them all the way from Winchester; killed and wounded 10 or 15, and took 60 or 80 prisoners. The enemy had crossed all their stock and men, except the rear guard, before we got here, and selected a position on the other side, from which we have driven his artillery; skirmishing is still going on. It is absolutely necessary for me to stop here and feed my men and horses. Have been without (forage) since yesterday morning, and little or nothing in the country. I only have two pieces of artillery that I have been able to get up, on account of the roads. The rebels got theirs over the worst road before the rain. I will follow them as soon as possible.

W.P. SANDERS.

Only 250 of Wolford’s men, under Lieutenant-Colonel Adams, arrived at Nicholasville. They are at Richmond by this time. I will send them to Somerset, if possible, in time; if you think that the most important duty, they shall be dispatched at once. There will be 1,150 cavalry and a section of a battery at Richmond at 10 o’clock to-day, with instructions to interpose between the enemy and the Big Hill road, and to take advantage of every opportunity to strike him. There is not enough cavalry at Glasgow. I will send the Fifth Indiana from Lebanon to Burkesville, if desirable.

GEO. L. HARTSUFF,

Major-General.

Maj. Gen. AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE.

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LEXINGTON, July 31, 1863.

GENERAL: The enemy went from Irvin to Lancaster, passing between Richmond and Big Hill. He is now below Stanford. His stock was passed by way of Crab Orchard, and will probably cross the Cumberland to-night. Sanders is at Stanford, having gone 100 miles in forty-eight hours, over a heavy, muddy road for a considerable part of the way. He has killed and wounded quite a number, and taken over 100 prisoners, among them the lieutenant-colonel of Scott’s regiment. A large number of guns and other property has been destroyed or captured. He has rested to feed but once since leaving here; men and horses are completely worn out. Have directed him to select as many as are able to keep up the pursuit, and push on. The enemy must be as badly off as he, and he will still capture a good many. Is Colonel Wolford acting under your instructions? If not, I will direct him to go to Somerset.

GEO. L. HARTSUFF,

Major-General.

General AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE.

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STANFORD, July 31, 1863.

GENERAL: I have just arrived here. Have fought and followed Scott from Big Hill to-day; have killed and wounded quite a number; taken over 100 prisoners; among them the lieutenant-colonel of Scott’s regiment. A large number of guns and other property has been destroyed or captured. My horses are completely worn out. Some of the men have had nothing to eat for three days, and have not rested to feed our horses but once since leaving Lexington. It is reported that Scott’s men are not much better off. They sent their stock by the way of Crab Orchard, and will probably get it over the Cumberland to-night. I shall rest and feed men here. Lieutenant Guthrie, loyal, Fifth Tennessee, was killed to-day.

W.P. SANDERS,

Colonel, Commanding.

General GEORGE L. HARTSUFF.

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NEAR WINCHESTER, July 31, 1863.

GENERAL: I drove the enemy from here in about an hour. All their force was here under Scott. I am following on the Winchester road. I have no rations and no forage, and it is said there is none in the country. The rebels do not contemplate stopping in this place any longer. Colonel Lilly lost everything except his men — your arms, camp equipage, &c.

W.P. GALL.

General GEORGE L. HARTSUFF.

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WINCHESTER, July 31, 1863.

(Received August 1.)

General BURNSIDE:

Will your Ninth Corps come up soon? You must try to let me have my cavalry regiment soon. The post at Clarksville is now without cavalry. The Second Ohio Cavalry was stopped for temporary purposes while on its way here. Telegraph line is now lengthening out, and I hope soon to compel the evacuation of East Tennessee. What can you do toward aiding and occupying it?

W.S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

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JULY 31, 1863.

General HARTSUFF:

You sent Fifth Indiana to Columbia, with scouts in the direction of Burkesville and Jamestown. You will hardly be able to get Wolford to Somerset in time, but do it if you can. I hope you may bag Scott’s command.

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

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CINCINNATI, July 31, 1863.

General CULLUM, Chief of Staff:

I have thought it necessary to issue this morning the following General Orders, which I hope will meet with the approval of the commanding general:

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, July 31, (1863.)

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 120.

Whereas the State of Kentucky is invaded by a rebel force, with the avowed intention of overawing the judges of elections, of intimidating the loyal voters, keeping them from the polls, and forcing the election of disloyal candidates at the election on the 3d of August; and whereas the military power of the Government is the only force that can defeat this attempt, the State of Kentucky is hereby declared under martial law, and all military officers are commanded to aid the constituted authorities of the State in the support of the laws and the purity of suffrage, as defined in the late proclamation of His Excellency Governor Robinson. As it is not the intention of the commanding general to interfere with the proper expression of public opinion, all direction of the conduct of the election will be, as usual, in the hands of the legally appointed judges at the polls, who will be held strictly responsible that no disloyal person be allowed to vote, and to this end the military power is ordered to give them its upmost support. The civil authority, civil courts and business will not be suspended by this order; it is for the purpose only of protecting, if necessary, the rights of loyal citizens and the freedom of election.

By command of Major-General Burnside, commanding department:

LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General, Commanding.

July 30, 1863

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HDQRS. SIXTH DIVISION, SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Columbus, Ky., July 30, 1863.

Maj. Gen. STEPHEN A. HURLBUT,

Commanding Sixteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication of 29th instant, with copy of Brigadier-General Dodge’s telegram.

Colonel Waring’s command was, on the 27th instant, 6 miles northwest of Paris, Tenn., and a portion of his cavalry were in Paris, but found no enemy there. I believe his command is now at Feliciana, near the State line. Inclosed please find my instructions just sent to him.

The Kentucky election, occurring on next Monday, is also of importance. Lucien Anderson, the Union candidate for Congress, was at Columbus yesterday. The rebel sympathizers will struggle to elect disloyal men; and, after mature consideration, I felt compelled to issue the inclosed explanatory order, as an addition to your Special Orders, No, 159, which had already been published and widely circulated.

Very respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

ASBOTH,

Brigadier-General.

(Inclosure.)

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Memphis, Tenn., July 14, 1863.

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 139.

In so much of the State of Kentucky as is within the District of Columbus it is ordered:

1st. That no person be permitted to be a candidate for office who is not avowedly and unconditionally for the Union and the suppression of the rebellion.

2d. That no person shall exercise the privilege of an elector and vote at said elections who is not avowedly and unconditionally for the Union and the suppression of the rebellion.

3d. The military authorities in said District of Columbus will see to it that this order is carried out. Judges of elections will be governed by the principles herein set forth, and will demand evidence upon oaths in such cases as may be in doubt, and allow no person to exercise the franchise of voting who does not take the oath required.

By order of Maj. Gen. S.A. Hurlbut:

HENRY BINMORE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Indorsement.)

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF COLUMBUS,

SIXTH DIVISION, SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Columbus, Ky., July 15, 1863.

ORDERS.

The above orders of the general commanding corps are communicated to the civil and military authorities for their information. Military officers making arrests for violation of these orders will be governed by the circular from office of Commissary-General of Prisoners, dated Washington, May 11, 1863.

By order of Brigadier-General Asboth:

T.H. HARRIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Sub-Inclosure.)

HDQRS. 6TH DIV., SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Columbus, Ky., July 29, 1863.

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 47.

That no further doubt may exist as to the intent and meaning of Special Orders, No. 159, dated Headquarters Sixteenth Army Corps, July 14, 1863, it is ordered that no person shall be permitted to be voted for or be a candidate for office who has been or is now under arrest or bonds, by proper authority, for uttering disloyal language or sentiments.

County judges within this district are hereby ordered to appoint as judges and clerks of the ensuing August election only such persons as are avowedly and unconditionally for the Union and the suppression of the rebellion, and are further ordered to revoke and recall any appointments of judges and  clerks already made who are now such loyal persons.

Judges and clerks of elections are hereby ordered not to place the name of any person upon the poll-books to be voted for at said election who is not avowedly and unconditionally for the Union and the suppression of the rebellion, or who may be opposed to furnishing men and money for the suppression of the rebellion.

The following oath is prescribed, and will be administered by judges of elections to voters and to such candidates as reside within this district:

I do solemnly swear that I have never entered the service of the so-called Confederate States; that I have not been engaged in the service of the so-called provisional government of Kentucky, either in a civil or military capacity; that I have never, either directly or indirectly, aided the rebellion against the Government of the United States or the State of Kentucky; that I am unconditionally for the Union and the suppression of the rebellion, and am willing to furnish men and money for the vigorous prosecution of the war against the rebellion league known as the Confederate States. So help me God.

Any voter, judge or clerk of election, or other person, who may evade, neglect, or refuse compliance with the provisions of this order, will be arrested and sent before a military commission as soon as the facts are substantiated.

By order of Brigadier-General Asboth:

T.H. HARRIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CINCINNATI, July 30, 1863.

General HARTSUFF:

A battery of artillery and two train-loads of cavalry are between Falmouth and Cynthiana. I think it will be well to let them go on to Nicholasville, to go from there to Richmond or Hickman Bridge, as you may like. What have you done with Gilbert’s cavalry? The cavalry that is on its way is part of Wolford’s brigade. The Forty-fifth Ohio belongs to the same brigade, and has just arrived at Paris. Will it not be well to order it to Nicholasville also, or do you think it would be better for the whole force to get off the trains at Paris, and move toward Irvine? I don’t think they can overtake Sanders, but by making a junction with Gilbert’s cavalry at Richmond, or near there, they can, with the battery, keep the enemy from coming on the Big Hill road from Irvine. Colonel Ross might march direct from Paris to Richmond at his leisure, and meet Wolford’s and Gilbert’s cavalry there. Answer.

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

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LEXINGTON, July 30, 1863.

GENERAL: Received dispatch from Sanders, dated 6.40 p.m. yesterday; nothing since. He had then just got a force across Red River, on the Irvine road; had only 1 man wounded and had captured 15 prisoners. After leaving Winchester, the rain had made the road so difficult that the artillery could with difficulty get along; the heaviest pieces were left with a guard, and instructions to come along as fast as possible. Enemy had abandoned a number of wagons on the road. Sanders’ force, sent to Paris, lost its way, and has not yet arrived. Have ordered the Fifth East Tennessee and what is at Paris, with battery, to Richmond, and will send there those that are on trains now. Enemy who was at Paris went in direction of Mount Sterling.

GEO. L. HARTSUFF,

Major-General.

Maj. Gen. AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY POST,

Paris, Ky., July 30, 1863.

SIR: About 2 o’clock yesterday the telegraph operator at Winchester arrived here and informed me that the rebels occupied Winchester; he did not know in what force, as he did not wait to ascertain, being afraid of capture. No official information had been received of any immediate danger at this point, but, in view of the proximity of the enemy, immediate steps were taken to meet him, should he venture to cut the railroad here.

About 4 p.m. the rebel advance drove in our pickets, but were immediately engaged by about 100 men of the Twenty-third Michigan and one piece of artillery of Henshaw’s battery. This force held the enemy until re-enforced by another company of the Twenty-third Michigan and one piece of  von Sehlen’s (Fifteenth Indiana) battery. Our whole force might have been concentrated in the front at once, but it was feared they would, by leaving a sufficient force to engage our troops on the Winchester pike, flank us on the Maysville pike, and burn the large trestle-work bridge of the Kentucky Central Railroad, which was doubtless their sold object in visiting us. In view of this contingency, I kept every approach to the bridges strongly guarded by the companies of the Twenty-third Michigan not engaged in front, and the detachment of the One hundred and eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and two pieces of the Fifteenth Indiana Battery. A little after 6 o’clock the enemy broke, and disappeared in great disorder back on the Winchester pike. Capt. G. Reid was sent to follow them up with about a dozen of his scouts — all that were present — which they did for a distance of 2 miles. I subsequently learned that the enemy left the Winchester pike about 6 miles from Paris, and took a dirt road which led to the Mount Sterling pike. During the night following, Colonels Maltby and Ross arrived from Winchester, bringing with them some prisoners taken at that place. The number of the enemy engaged with my force was counted by a Union farmer; he states that he counted 375 before they attempted to “trade horses with him,” and that 15 or 20 passed afterward. I have about 175 men and two pieces of artillery engaged. The enemy was mounted, and for a time fired briskly, but the artillery threw him into, and kept him in, disorder, until he fled. The enemy’s known loss is 1 wounded severely; casualties on our side, none.

In closing this report, I deem it proper to mention the valuable assistance rendered me by Brigadier-General Burbridge, who, although he did not assume command, yet I was aided by his advice and plans for defense, and he took charge of the execution of the most important and dangerous part of it himself.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. L. YOUNG,

Lieutenant-Colonel 118th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Comdg. Post.

Lieut. Col. G.B. DRAKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

**********

PARIS, July 30, 1863.

GENERAL: The Forty-fifth Ohio have arrived from Winchester. They report the main rebel force, 2,000 strong, with eight pieces of artillery, as having retreated on the Irvine road. Colonel Sanders is in pursuit. They retreated after being driven back by us, finding the place too strong for them. Colonel Ross captured 1 captain and 15 men, near Paris. They are waiting for the force that crossed Stoner Creek. I will have the party pursued. Where shall the prisoners be sent?

S.G. BURBRIDGE,

Brigadier-General.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE L. HARTSUFF.

**********

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST  TENNESSEE,

Knoxville, July 30, 1863.

Brig. Gen. W. PRESTON, Abingdon, Va.:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs me to inform you of his intention to march next Sunday morning (August 2) on the enemy now stationed on Louisa and Beaver Creeks. You will please hold 600 infantry at your command, your two batteries and 1,000 cavalry in readiness to march at any moment. The main force of the expedition will be furnished from other brigades, to whom you will furnish the necessary transportation for 80,000 rations, 400,000 rounds of ammunition for small-arms, and 3,000 rounds for artillery.

You will please inform these headquarters of the latest and most reliable information received relative to the position of the enemy at the above-mentioned points.

At Saltville are two Napoleon guns, fully equipped. The major general commanding proposes to borrow them, for the time of the expedition, of Maj. Gen. Sam. Jones, and furnish him in their place with four 6-pounder guns. You will please make the necessary arrangements with General Jones to that effect.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

V. SHELIHA,

Chief of Staff.

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