CINCINNATI, Ohio, April 11, 1863.

Maj. Gen. H.W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I am concentrating the troops as rapidly as possible, with advanced posts at London, Somerset, Liberty, and Glasgow, with scouting parties as far as Selma, on the Cumberland. I am at a loss to determine upon a plan of diminishing the garrisons at Bowling Green, Munfordville, and other important points on the railroad, but think I shall be able to take considerable of the force from General Boyle’s district, and concentrate them at or near Tompkinsville. The force at Louisa, in Eastern Kentucky, is as small as it ought to be. In fact, there ought to be more men in front of Pound Gap. There is no enemy of any moment now this side of Cumberland River, and, if the forces are not diverted by cavalry raids, I hope to be able to concentrate a considerable column to move in co-operation with Rosecrans. I am expecting a staff officer here from him to-day for consultation, and will report to you the result. What we most lack now is cavalry. The enemy is in considerable force in Wayne County, Pegram having been re-enforced by a brigade of cavalry, under Jackson, from East Tennessee. They number in all between 4,000 and 5,000. I shall move against them in two or three days unless there is something else to be done of more benefit to Rosecrans. He telegraphs me Morgan is coming up to join that force, and that they are going to attempt a crossing at Bucksville and Selma. The rebel forces in the Gap and at Knoxville are very small.

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

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WASHINGTON, D.C., April 11, 1863.

Major-General BURNSIDE, Cincinnati:

Reports have been received here that Senator (Lazarus W.) Powell, candidate for Governor of Kentucky, has acted in a disloyal manner, and advocated the secession of that State from the Union. You will cause his conduct to be closely observed and reported to these headquarters.

H.W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, April 11, 1863 — 3 p.m.

Maj. Gen. H.W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Your dispatch received, and I will look out for Mr. Powell. There is nothing new this morning. No enemy north of the Cumberland, but a considerable force in Wayne County, with headquarters at Mill Springs. Hope to attack them in two or three days. A messenger from General Rosecrans is now here, and I will write you the result of the interview. There is nothing very definite as to the capture of trains on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. General Wright telegraphs that the train reported captured has arrived at Nashville. Will telegraph again to-day. I move to the interior Monday or Tuesday. Have ordered court to try Major Prentice as a spy.

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, April 11, 1863.

Maj. Gen. H.W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

The fortifications about Cincinnati are now nearly completed, and it would seem advisable not to stop their armament. I have assigned an infantry regiment for practice at the guns, and ask authority to make an artillery regiment of it, in which case it can readily be filled up to its maximum number, which will be sufficient to man the forts. A report has just been sent with reference to fortifications at Louisville, which I respectfully request permission to have erected at once by hired labor. The plan is to build eight small, inclosed works, all of which can be done within two or three weeks. These two very important points will then be perfectly secure, and a repetition of last summer’s stampede avoided in case of any reverse. Instead of rendering the force in this department less mobile, it will enable us to concentrate large bodies to operate in the field without having to look so much to the rear. Shall I commence the works?

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, April 11, 1863.

Maj. Gen. H.W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

The system of fortifying was adopted by General Wright, and I have not had time to look into the matter fully. He seems to have adopted it with a view to holding points with small forces.

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Cincinnati, April 11, 1863.

Maj. Gen. W.S. ROSECRANS,

I have received the following dispatch from General Wright:

I learn from General Judah that General Rosecrans has ordered the Third Kentucky Cavalry, now at Russellville, to Murfreesborough. This leaves that section without mounted force. This regiment was sent into Kentucky some time ago by General Rosecrans, and it was the understanding with him that it was to remain if certain other mounted force was sent him from Kentucky. I may have misunderstood his agreement. Let it remain permanently, but this dispatch will show what his understanding was. At any rate it should not be removed without orders from you, and such orders should pass through me.

H.G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General.

I will retain the regiment until I hear from you, and if you then want it, I will send it. Answer.

A.E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

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